Author Topic: What is UFS?  (Read 1456 times)

Cetonis

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What is UFS?
« on: May 28, 2014 03:38AM »

Hello all, my name is Tim and I'm looking to get a group going for the UFS CCG at The Battle Standard. Makes sense to start with an overall description of the game, right?


- What is UFS?

UFS stands for Universal Fighting System. As the name implies, it's a collectible card game system intended to support characters from a range of combat-related licenses.

Most recently, they have released a tin-based set for Mega Man, with tins for both Mega Man and Proto Man. Each tin contains a 60 card newbie-friendly starter deck, three character cards of robot masters from the original Mega Man video game, and three booster packs containing cards from a 29 card Mega Man mini-set exclusive to the tins. There's also a rules sheet, as well as a poster with an intro playmat on the back.

Another tin set for Darkstalkers (Morrigan and Lilith) slated for July. That will be followed by full booster sets for each license in the fall and winter. The other sets currently in standard include three sets for the King of Fighters XIII fighting game, and two sets of an original property called Red Horizon.


- Why play UFS instead of (or in addition to) other CCGs?

There are some major differences between the game mechanics of UFS and those of the most well-known CCGs. So whether you're looking for a little something different to enjoy on the side, or you never quite found a CCG that you enjoyed, you may find UFS to be a refreshing change of pace. Here's a basic outline of some of the key differences:

1) UFS has no creatures or monsters of any kind. Instead you play attack cards from your hand - punches, kicks, weapon attacks, ranged shots, and so on - which your opponent will have an opportunity to try and block with a card from their hand.

But attacks have different zones (high, mid, low) to account for, and of course there are abilities being played on both sides to support the players' efforts. You'll need to outmaneuver your opponent's resources, abilities, available blocks, and block zones in order to win.

2) You draw up to your full hand size each turn. If you have 2 cards in your hand and your character has a hand size of 7, that means you draw 5 cards during that turn's Draw Step.

As a result, players have a lot more options than in many other card games, and more cards get played overall. On a typical turn a player might play 3 to 6 cards, while their opponent may play 1 to 3 in the course of blocking.

3) The costing system in UFS is not strictly defined, where if something costs 5 you pay 5 to play it. Instead, it includes a risk/reward element, by which the amount you pay is determined not only by your card's difficulty, but the difference between that and the "control" value of a card discarded off the top of your deck.

You don't know what that control value is until you attempt to play the card, so players need to weigh their possibilities and their rough odds before attempting any moderate to high difficulty play.

At first blush it sounds like a swingy luck element, but in practice the range of likely controls is narrow enough, and enough cards are played over the course of a game, that it's hard to truly have a game won or lost that way unless a player knowingly opened themselves up to it.

4) Of course, if you're a fan of Mega Man, Darkstalkers, or any of the other licenses, there's always that reason too :)


- Sounds complicated.

It can be. The learning curve is not as gentle as some others, though the simplicity of the Mega Man starter decks helps with that a bit. You can expect game states where each player has 3-7 cards in hand and 6-10 abilities available for use, which you'll somehow need to translate into a series of decisions you feel good about making. It takes some getting used to.

And due to the nature of the game, there are few if any clear theories to guide you. (a la Card Advantage in MtG) Much of the time there's no single right answer; you need plain old experience to develop your own feel for things and build decks that play well with the style you grow into. It's not an easy game, but if you enjoy a challenge it's a heck of a lot of fun.


- Demos?

I'll be trying to drop in for demos each Thursday and Sunday (that I am in town) over the coming weeks. Will get some threads posted in the proper format soon.


- Other resources

I've compiled a bunch more information and links here while the new website gets worked out: http://forums.jascogames.com/forums/showthread.php?9894-New-to-UFS-Start-here!

There's also the official facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/PlayUFS
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rotumn

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Re: What is UFS?
« Reply #1 on: Jun 20, 2014 11:29PM »

I talked briefly with you last night at the store about the demo you were set up to run. I was looking at the King of the fighter packs and saw they had Samurai Showdown which I was a huge fan of years ago. It would be fun to try sometime I will have to catch a demo or watch one one of these nights.
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Cetonis

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Re: What is UFS?
« Reply #2 on: Jun 23, 2014 02:57AM »

Hey; I'm gonna miss out on doing demos this week due to a major tournament I'm going to in Atlanta next weekend, but I should be back at it the following week. Is there a night that would work best for you to come try it out?

In the meantime, I'm trying to get a facebook group going for interested people if you'd like to hop in. Link:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1622550644637450/

As for Samurai Showdown, my familiarity with some of the SNK characters from CvSNK2 was actually part of what helped me get into the game in the first place :) I started with a friend using a "battle box" they made for Siegfried vs Sophitia (our respective characters of choice in SC3, as it so happened) and chose to get packs of the first SNK set when I won prizes in MtG events.

Nostalgia aside, it's all legacy format by now, and it can be tricky to find those old sets. (typically you need to resort to eBay) But if you do, and you have some people who can abide by a "don't be a jerk" policy (competitive legacy can get quite miserable) it can be fun to play some decks with the old Street Fighter, Soul Calibur, and Samurai Showdown characters every so often.
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